X
  • Together...
    promoting
    quality of life
    for residents

DOWNLOAD COMPLETE CONTENT OF THE WEBSITE IN PDF VERSION
HVD CONFERENCE 2018 BROCHURE
 

CONFERENCE HVD EVALUATION:
YOUR COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS ARE IMPORTANT.

Thank you for participating in the HVD 2018 CONFERENCE , « Together Promoting Quality of Life for Residents ». We would appreciate your feedback! If you did not have the opportunity to fill our evaluation form after the conference, you can respond online at the following link:
EVALUATION FORM
HVD 2018 Conference logo

CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES:

Training and information for residents, their families, volunteers and caregivers – with the participation of employees of long term care facilities as well as the community – about innovative approaches and concrete strategies in order to:

  • Promote improved quality of life and respect of residents
  • Promote a better understanding of residents’ needs
  • Support easier navigation of the public health network related to long term care
  • Promote the respect of residents and ensure their implementation in daily life

CONFERENCE TARGET AUDIENCE:

  • Residents living in public long-term care settings, family caregivers and significant others who assist them
  • Residents’ committees and users’ committees
  • Stakeholders working with residents and family caregivers: patient attendants, nurses, licensed practical nurses, other industry professionals, and volunteers
  • Complaint and service quality managers and commissioners
  • Community support groups for seniors and persons with disabilities
  • Researchers, teachers, interns/students

REGISTRATION PERIOD IS EXTENDED UNTIL OCTOBER 10TH
OR UNTIL AVAILABLE PLACES ARE FILLED

PLACE

Le Nouvel Hôtel & Spa
Montreal

DIRECTIONS

DATE

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
8am to 4:45pm

SCHEDULE OF THE DAY

REGISTRATION

from July 20th to the
October 10th, 2018

REGISTER

Logo Le Nouvel Hôtel

Reduced rate for roomsFor our out-of-town participants, the Nouvel Hôtel is offering a reduced rate for rooms for those attending the conference. For more information, please contact us at:

conference.hvd@gmail.com

450 378-9144

Handicap-Vie-Dignité’s conference on the rights of residents and how to advocate for them, in public long-term care settings

Bilingual conference and workshops (French and English)

 

PRE-EVENT PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN

  • NICOLE POIRIER

  • NICOLE JAOUISH

  • JOHANNE RAVENDA

  • GHISLAINE PHARAND

  • DAPHNE NAHMIASH

  • DANIEL PILOTE

 

USER RIGHTS GUIDE

ARE YOU CONCERNED BY THE WELFARE AND QUALITY OF CARE OF A LOVED ONE LIVING IN A LONG TERM CARE FACILITY?
DO YOU KNOW HOW TO EXERCISE AND ENSURE THE RESPECT OF THEIR RIGHTS ?

VIDEO - MARIE BEAULIEU

CLIC HERE TO OBTAIN A FREE COPY OF THE TWELVE HEATHCARE USERS’ RIGHTS.
( English translation to come )
12 USER RIGHTS

BILINGUAL CONFERENCE WEBCASTING WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON.

MORNING

REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST

WELCOME

Johanne Ravenda, advocate, former health care assistant (PAB) and former caregiver/care partner
President and Cofounder with the late Hélène Rumak
Handicap-Vie-Dignité
Graduate of McGill University with a Masters in Social Work
Marie Beaulieu, Ph. D., MSRC/FRSC
Codirector, World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre, Elder Abuse
University of Sherbrooke, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, School of Social Work
AND Research Centre on Aging, CIUSS Estrie-CHUS

BACKGROUND AND RAISON-D’ÊTRE OF THE CONFERENCE: THE HÉLÈNE RUMAK FUND
AS PART OF THE HISTORIC CLASS ACTION AGREEMENT ENTERED INTO BY HANDICAP-VIE-DIGNITÉ AGAINST THE HÔPITAL SAINT-CHARLES-BORROMÉE

Me Geneviève Pépin, LL.B. LL.M.
Lawyer, Ménard Martin, Barristers and Solicitors
"Knowing one’s rights for better control of one’s life and health"

THE SAINT-CHARLES-BORROMÉE CASE

youtube.com/watch?v=PtJoYe3DQZM

PROGRESS REPORT ON PUBLIC LONG-TERM CARE NURSING HOMES IN QUEBEC
MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF PROVIDING A TIGHTENED SAFETY NET FOR VULNERABLE RESIDENTS

Yvon Riendeau, M.A. B.Ed.
Social Gerontologist and Sexologist

The current challenge of nursing homes (NH) is basically to attempt to stay the course towards fulfilment of their mission and role, while checking to ensure that their programming is efficient, suitable for residents and in keeping with their staff's abilities and ratios. Furthermore, NHs must re-examine how they deliver their strategies to optimize and improve overall quality. Finally, they must continually examine ministerial policy directives regarding the living environment as much in terms of the physical and human environment standpoint as in care practices and service delivery, while respecting the rules of professional ethics. Labour relations and relational approaches to residents are also realities to be recognized and challenges to overcome, in the context of respect for the needs and rights of residents. On the whole, currently, the various health profiles (ISO-SMAF) of the residential clientele, the available machinery and equipment, the allocated budgets and the healthy cohabitation of residents without ageism or bullying are major challenges. These are of serious concern when it comes to ensuring a tightened safety net for vulnerable residents and promoting a culture of proper treatment for all, residents and workers alike.

PANEL
TRANSFORMING AN INSTITUTIONAL CULTURE TOWARDS A CULTURE OF PROPER TREATMENT AND RESPECT OF RESIDENTS’ RIGHTS

Daphne Nahmiash, Ph. D.
Vice President, Handicap-Vie Dignité (Disability-Life-Dignity)
Associate member, McGill University Research Centre for Studies in Aging (MCSA)
Founder and Honorary president, Notre-Dame-de-Grâce (NDG) Community
Committee on Elder Abuse (NDGCCEA)
Me Christine Morin, Chairholder, titular professor
Antoine-Turmel Research Chair on Legal Protection of the Elderly
Faculty of Law, Université Laval
AND/OR
Me Katherine Champagne, Coordinator
Antoine-Turmel Research Chair on Legal Protection of the Elderly
Faculty of Law, Université Laval

INTRODUCTION
WHAT DO I EXPERIENCE LIVING IN A CHSLD?
MR. P’S MINUTE.

Video by Daniel Pilote, a young resident living with muscular dystrophy

PANELISTS:

1. RIGHTS’ PERSPECTIVE — RESIDENTS’ COMMITTEES, USERS, FAMILIES:
Me Paul Brunet, MAP, lawyer
CEO and spokesperson
Conseil pour la protection des malades (CPM) (Council for the Protection of the Sick)
2. NURSING VISION
Anne Bourbonnais, inf., Ph. D.
Associate Professor
Holder of the Research Chair in Nursing Care for Older Persons and Family
Faculty of Nursing, University of Montreal


Researcher
(Research Centre, Montreal University Institute of Geriatrics - Island of Montreal Centre-Sud district’s Integrated Health and Social Service University Centre)
3. PATIENT ATTENDANTS’ PERSPECTIVE, RESIDENTS’ DAILY CARE
Yvon Riendeau, M.A. B.Ed.
Social Gerontologist, Course instructor (Patient attendants) and Sexologist
4. A DIFFERENT APPROACH, CARPE DIEM
Nicole Poirier, Director and Founder of Carpe Diem –Alzheimer’s Resource Centre
Masters Degree in Public Administration from the École nationale d’administration publique (ENAP) (National School of Public Administration). Studies in Psychology and Gerontology at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières.
5. THE OPTIMAL APPROACH FOR RESIDENTS IN CHSLD
Daniel Geneau, M.A., neuropsychologist
Director, Advisory Services in Psychogeriatrics, Teaching and Consulting (SEPEC - Services d'expertise en psychogériatrie)

AFTERNOON

FOUR INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS

Breakout: participants participate in 2 of the 4 workshops in English or French

Participants will use actual cases in order to collectively pursue avenues towards appropriate solutions involving families, residents as well as caregivers, all in an effort to enforce rights.

WORKSHOP 1

Offered in French and English

The role and the limits of users’ committees in responding to situations of mistreatment in long term care

LEARN MORE

WORKSHOP 2

Offered in French and English

Advocacy: a proactive approach to promote the rights to dignity and quality of care of residents in situations of vulnerability

LEARN MORE

WORKSHOP 3

Offered in French and English

Ensuring personhood at the nucleus of individualized care

LEARN MORE

WORKSHOP 4

Offered in French and English

Preventing the use of physical and chemical (antipsychotic drugs) restraints and finding alternatives

LEARN MORE

WORKSHOPS BLOCK 1

Choice of one of the four workshops

WORKSHOPS BLOCK 2

Choice of one of the four workshops

PLENARY SESSION, RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION

At the plenary session, a member of the Expert Advisory Committee will be responsible for briefly presenting a recap of the important points, questions raised and recommendations issued for each workshop.

Handicap-Vie-Dignité Logo
 

WORKSHOPS DESCRIPTIONS

DOWNLOAD WORKSHOPS OF HVD CONFERENCE 2018 (PDF VERSION)

  • WORKSHOP 1
  • WORKSHOP 2
  • WORKSHOP 3
  • WORKSHOP 4

THE ROLE AND THE LIMITS OF USERS’ COMMITTEES IN RESPONDING TO SITUATIONS OF MISTREATMENT IN LONG TERM CARE

Workshop offered in French and English

LEADERS
Marie-Ève Bédard, Ph.D., in gerontology
Researcher at the Centre collégial d’expertise en gérontologie du Cégep de Drummondville (Cegep Drummondville’s College Centre of Expertise in Gerontology)
Academic Research Advisor at the Cégep de Drummondville (Cegep Drummondville)
Active practicing member at the University of Sherbrooke’s Research Chair on Mistreatment of older adults
Benoit Racette, Trainer, Conseil pour la protection des malades (CPM)
Communicator and advocate for the right to health of minorities and disabled persons
OBJECTIVES

This workshop will remove the veil of secrecy over situations of abuse of older adults or vulnerable persons that are brought to the attention of the user committees, several members of which also sit on the residents’ committee; as well as the way in which these committees respond to situations of mistreatment; their role and their limitations. Through research results and experience-sharing in the area of advocacy on behalf of users, we will highlight the contribution of user committees in the fight against abuse of seniors and vulnerable persons in Quebec’s health and social service facilities.

More specifically, this workshop will provide participants with a better understanding of:

  • the nature and causes of abuse situations brought to the attention of the user committees, the majority of which occur in long-term care facilities.
  • the characteristics of abused and abusive individuals and the power dynamics between them
  • the actions implemented by the committees to deal with, prevent or rectify these situations of abuse
  • the impact of the committee, the needs and expectations that are taken into account or met addressed by the facility
  • the factors that support or curtail the user committees’ efforts to deal with situations of abuse and their autonomy
  • the sources of authority to which the committees have access within the facilities, the level of engagement needed to respond to situations of abuse and bring about change (terms of reference, legislation and rights related to users, regarding health care and with respect to vulnerable individuals)
  • how to act on practical recommendations for helping the committee step up its advocacy efforts on behalf of users and, by doing so, improve prevention and eradication of abuse in the health and social service network.
  • what institutional, legal and community resources are offered in support of this advocacy effort

ADVOCACY: A PROACTIVE APPROACH TO PROMOTE THE RIGHTS TO DIGNITY AND QUALITY OF CARE OF RESIDENTS IN SITUATIONS OF VULNERABILITY

Workshop offered in French and English

LEADERS
Ann Vergeylen, Caregiver, advocate
Master’s degree in Educational Technology, Concordia University
Trainer, NDG Community Commitee on Elder Abuse (NDGCCEA)
Johanne Ravenda, advocate, former patient attendant and caregiver
President and Cofounder with the late Hélène Rumak
Handicap-Vie-Dignité
Graduate of McGill University with a Masters in Social Work
OBJECTIVES

Any person living in a long-term care facility needs a person, free from any conflict of interest, to represent them and advocate for their dignity and right to proper treatment. In many cases, a family member or trusted friend is assigned this role. To become a better advocate, this individual needs to understand user rights in long-term care accommodations and how to apply and exercise them on a daily basis. In this workshop, you will learn what an advocate is and does and why it is important today to speak out on behalf of an institutionalized individual. As an informed advocate, you will also learn to identify and report the warning signs in care settings, including abuse and the more personal aspects of care. In doing so, you will be involved in reducing, if not eradicating, situations of abuse and neglect while proactively promoting proper treatment.

Through practical exercises, after this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Understand the concept of proactive advocacy
  • Understand its principles of response
  • Identify the rights and responsibilities of residents
  • Recognize situations of abuse and neglect in a long-term care setting
  • Instill a sense of responsibility in each and every one to report and respond when situations of abuse and neglect are suspected
  • Develop a tool box for improved response with the authorities involved
  • Identify the steps needed to lodge a complaint, either formal or informal, in order to prevent or rectify a situation of abuse or neglect
  • Identify strategies for addressing known barriers when lodging a complaint
  • Apply your knowledge of the rights of users to improve their quality of life in a long-term care setting

ENSURING PERSONHOOD AT THE NUCLEUS OF INDIVIDUALIZED CARE

Workshop offered in French and English

LEADERS
Francine Cytrynbaum, MSW, University of Montreal
Teacher in social work, UQAM & Special Care Counselling, Vanier College.
Trainer and support group animator, Alzheimer Society of Montreal
Dayna Morrow, Bachelor degree, Therapeutic Recreation, Concordia University
Master’s degree , Family Life Education, McGill University
Teacher in Special Care Counselling, Vanier College
Trainer, Alzheimer Society of Montreal
OBJECTIVES

Person-centered care is the term used to describe the approach used in many long-term care settings…but is it? What does it really mean and is it truly being practiced? Either way, can it work, be successful and have its benefits for residents? How can gaps be identified and improvements in daily care practices be made? With the goal of creating interpersonal partnerships between care staff, people with dementia and their family members, implementing person-centered care plans needs to be holistic, individualized and flexible in nature and engage players in promoting the needs and the rights of the individual resident.

The workshop will use interactive exercises and case discussion in order for participants to be able to:

  • identify the concept of person centered care,
  • recognize the team players and their roles within the care plan,
  • identify where gaps may be in the approach to meeting needs,
  • promote and encourage advocacy of dignified residential treatment,
  • understand and be able to advocate for the right for residents to be treated with dignity,
  • identify and use interventions and techniques to meet individualized needs, and
  • develop a “toolkit” of the various components required by family caregivers and staff in order to promote effective individualized care.

PREVENTING THE USE OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL (ANTIPSYCHOTIC DRUGS) RESTRAINTS AND FINDING ALTERNATIVES

Workshop offered in French and English

LEADERS
Susan Macaulay, B.A. (Communications), Concordia University
Author, blogger (Myalzheimersstory.com), advocate, activist against the inappropriate use of antipsychotic drugs in long-term care
Nathalie Houle, Clinical Nurse
Assistant to the head nurse and interim unit head for the CISSS des Laurentides
student in the Masters of Nursing program at the University of Montreal
Me Hélène Guay, Lawyer specializing in health law
Bachelor’s degree at McGill University
Masters degree in Health Law from the University of Sherbrooke
OBJECTIVES

Since 1998, the law authorizes under certain conditions the use of force, isolation, mechanical or chemicals means to prevent a person from inflicting harm upon himself or others. In 2002, the Ministry of Health adopted its orientations regarding the application of such measures. However, concerns are being raised with their use in long term care institutions. Are these restraints adapted and respectful of the needs of residents in long term care facilities, and respectful of the best practices? What improvements should be made? What initiatives and pilot projects have succeeded in avoiding the use of physical or chemical restraints in long term care institutions? For many, alternatives must be found in order to respect residents’ rights.

In this workshop, we will take a closer look at what comprises physical and chemical restraints in dementia care, how to recognize when they are being used and what are the potential risks and side effects of their use. By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the different types of physical and chemical restraints
  • Understand their supportive legal background and why they are being used
  • Understand the importance of the right to enlightened / informed consent in such a context
  • Identify the known consequences and the risks attached to the use of chemical restraints
  • Understand some of the alternatives to physical and chemical restraints
  • Understand the necessity for implication of residents and their family members to prevent inappropriate use of physical and chemical restraints
 

SPEAKERS AND PANEL MEMBERS

Click on the photos to read the biographies


MEMBERS OF THE EXPERT ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2017-2018
(5 meetings since April 2017)

Linda August
Program Administrator - SAPA CIUSSS Accommodation, Centre-Ouest-de-l’île-de-Montréal, Training Manager in Mistreatment Prevention
Marie Beaulieu, Ph. D., MSRC/FRSC
Co-director, World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre, Senior Abuse.
Chairholder, Research chair on Senior Abuse, University of Sherbrooke, Faculty of Letters and Human Sciences, School of Social Work and Research Centre on Aging, CIUSS Estrie-CHUS
Marguerite Blais
Special Advisor — Older adults and Caregivers, Octane Strategy
Former politician and Minister Responsible for Seniors (2007-2012), Quebec National Assembly
Anne Bourbonnais, RN, Ph. D.
Associate Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal
Chairholder of the Research Chair in Nursing Care for Older People and their Families
Researcher, Research Centre of the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal of the Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Centre-Sud-de-l’Île-de-Montréal universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal
Me Paul Brunet
President, Conseil pour la protection des malades (CPM)
Me Katherine Champagne
Coordinator, Antoine-Turmel Research Chair on the Legal Protection of the Elderly, Laval University
Francine Cytrynbaum
Teacher, Special Care Counselling, Vanier College / Lecturer, Social Work, at UQAM, Trainer and support group animator, Alzheimer Society of Montreal
Hélène Durand
Caregiver, Retired occupational therapist in long term care setting
Sophie Ethier
Associate professor and director, certificate program in Gerontology, School of Social Work and Criminology, University of Laval
Nicole Jaouich
Caregiver / President of the Residents’ Committee, CHSLD Saint Joseph de la Providence and Pavillon des Bâtisseurs / Secretary, Handicap-Vie-Dignité
Michel Gervais
Former Caregiver / Retired Teacher / Treasurer, Handicap-Vie-Dignité (HVD)
Ura Greenbaum
Director, Association for the Defense of People and Their Properties Under Public Curatorship / Member of the Board of Directors of the Table de concertation des aînés de Montréal.
Me Hélène Guay
Lawyer specializing in health law, Hélène Guay Firm
Roxane Leboeuf
Research Professional, Coordinator, Research Chair on Mistreatment of Older Adults, Sherbrooke University
Daphne Nahmiash
Gerontologist, Expert in Mistreatment of the Older Adults / Vice-president, Handicap-Vie-Dignité
Jean Noiseux
Resident, Centre d’hébergement Paul-Émile-Léger & Vice-President, User’s Committee, CSSS Jeanne-Mance
Susan Macaulay
Author, blogger Myalzheimersstory.com, advocate, activist against the inappropriate use of antipsychotic drugs in long-term care
Me Jean-Pierre Ménard
Lawyer, Ménard, Martin, Attorney for Handicap-Vie-Dignité (HVD) (Disability-Life-Dignity) / Collective Action against Hôpital Saint-Charles-Borromée
Marguerite Mérette
Former Nurse at CHSLD, Caregiver, Author (Pour la liberté d’être, Réflexions d’une infirmière en CHSLD)
Me Christine Morin
Chairholder, Antoine-Turmel Research Chair on the Legal Protection of the Elderly, Titular Professor, Laval University Faculty of Law
Me Geneviève Pépin
Lawyer, Ménard, Martin, Attorney for HVD / Collective Action against Hôpital Saint-Charles-Borromée
Ghislaine Pharand
Caregiver, former member of a residents’ committee
Daniel Pilote
Resident, CHSLD Champagnat de Saint-Jean-sur-le-Richelieu, Blogger, Monsieur P.
Nicole Poirier
Executive Director, creator of the Carpe Diem Approach, Alzheimer Resources, Trois-Rivières
Johanne Ravenda
Former Caregiver and Patient care attendant, Cofounder (with the late Helene Rumak) and President of Handicap-Vie-Dignité (Disability-Life-Dignity)
Yvon Riendeau
Social Gerontologist, Course instructor in Social Gerontology at UQAM, trainer for PABs and auxiliaries in CLSCs, trainer for nursing home staff, conference speaker for older adults.
Nathalie Ross
Former Program Director and Government Relations Officer, Canadian Multiple Sclerosis Society, Quebec Division
Me Angelique Tsasis
Legal Specialist in Health Rights, HVD Collaborator
Ann Vergeylen
Caregiver, Dementia Care Advocate, Board of Directors, Member of NDG Community Committee on Elder Abuse (NDGCCEA)
 

REGISTRATION & RATES

Individuals

$25
  • Residents
  • Families
  • Caregivers
  • Volunteers
  • Students

REGISTER NOW

REGISTRATION FORM

Professionals

$50
  • Users’ and Residents’ Committees
  • CHSLD staff
  • Other professionals
  • Community organizations
  • Other

REGISTER NOW

REGISTRATION FORM


For Payment by PayPal:

* Limited space only. Registration is on a first come, first serve basis. Registration closes on September 20, 2018, or when sold out.
 

INFORMATION & CONTACT